9 nyawa Tewas Lagi di Afghanistan (Nine U.S. troops killed as helicopter crashes in Afghanistan)

Nine U.S. troops killed as helicopter crashes in Afghanistan
Number of 2010 casualties overtakes last year’s total
 

Nine American service members with the international coalition in
Afghanistan were killed this morning when their helicopter crashed.

The cause of the accident is not yet clear – and there were no reports of enemy fire.

There
were two survivors – an Afghan National Army soldier and a U.S.
civilian – who were transported to a military medical centre, Nato said.

File picture of Lynx helicopters from the Army Air Corp in Afghanistan, where a Nato chopper has gone down in Zabul province killing nine

Crash: A Lynx helicopter from the Army Air Corp
in Afghanistan, where a Nato chopper has gone down in Zabul province
killing nine (file picture)

The crash occurred in south-eastern Zabul province.

Although nationalities have not been confirmed. a source told CNN all nine victims were American.

NATO said there were no reports of enemy fire in the area.

Taliban
spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi told AP by telephone that insurgents shot
down the helicopter – but the Taliban often claim responsibility for
military accidents.

Most helicopter crashes in the country have been accidents caused by maintenance problems or factors such as dust.

The deaths raise to 32 the number of international troops killed so far this month in Afghanistan.

Two U.S. service crew were killed in the most recent helicopter crash
in southern Helmand in July, which the Taliban claimed to have caused.

In April, three service members were killed when a U.S. Air Force
Osprey went down seven miles from Qalat, capital of Zabul, south-west
of Kabul. 

It was the first crash of the costly tilt-rotor aircraft in a combat zone, the U.S. military said.

The deaths took the number killed in 2010 to at least 529, up from 521 in 2009.

In July 2009, two Canadian troops and a Briton were killed in a
helicopter crash, also in Zabul.

Helicopters are used extensively
by both Nato and the Afghan government forces to transport and supply
troops spread out across a mountainous country with few roads.

Losses
have been relatively light, despite insurgent fire and
difficult conditions, and most crashes have been accidents caused by
maintenance problems or factors such as dust.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: